MIA
ANDRÉSEN

Carta Marina

Project ‘CARTA MARINA’ 2014

 

Project ‘Carta Marina’ started as a collaboration with Joep van Lieshout on Atelier van lieshout/Mia Andrésen Tribal dress 2013 and is developing into a world of designed garments, objets, paintings and photographs describing future living.

“We will always search for new aesthetics, no matter how we make our clothes in the future”. Project ‘Carta Marina’ is giving a suggestion.

 

GARMENTS

HEADDRESSES

TIGHTSMAN Collection

PHOTOGRAPHS

PAINTINGS/DRAWINGS

The Garments made for Carta Marina are made out of scrap materials imagining use and  aesthetics for the future days.

There may be a fashion out of making clothes out of waste products. There might as well come new individualistic religions and attitudes to our future society.

 

 

 

Photography: Dorothea van der Staaij

'Tribal dress' Mia Andrésen/Joep van Lieshout 2013

Photography: Dorothea van der Staaij

Tightsmans Collection Carta Marina 2014

 

Photographs

The photo sessions were made in a Dutch forest park in february 2014 and shows a theatrical suggestion of attitudes and daily situations at the Carta Marina.

The photographs can be exhibited together with the Garments and headdresses to intensify the experience.

 

Photography :

Dorothea van Der Staaij/STAAIJstudio.nl

 

Models:

Nikita van der Linden,

Dennis Bijleveldt

Prince JJ

 

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Photoproject 'Return' Mia Andrésen/Dorothea van Der Staaij 2013.

 

www.staaijstudio.nl

Paintings/drawings

What if we mutate in 2265? Or we make new textiles out of trash? Maybe we can live under water or have to source new skin from bark hanging off trees? What will be the purpose of our garments and the animals in the future?

 

 The concept ‘Carta Marina’ is based on the way the Swedish geographer and historian Olaus Magnus discovered and visualized in the 1500s. He travelled around in Scandinavia and created a huge map of carved woodblocks of sea, land, beasts, people and buildings. The production took 12 years with the first copies printed in 1539 in Venice.

 

The map was based on  interwieves, sayings and native folk stories filled with strange beasts and occupations.   “At the time the medieval imagination was still free to shape its own forms of the natural world. The chart’s giant lobster gripping a swimmer in its claws, a monster being mistaken for an island, and a mast-high serpent devouring sailors would have represented actual fears of the unknown deep.

 

Those and Olaus’ other fanciful sea beasts are not mere decorations to fill empty spaces. Nor are they only visual metaphors for dangers lurking in the sea. Intended as representations of actual marine life, they are identified in the map’s key.

 

Through his map and its voluminous commentary, Olaus became the age’s principal chronicler of the sea serpent, the giant squid, and sea monsters in general. These representations were influential for centuries and are still discussed in our own time.”  This text was adapted from Sea Monsters: A Voyage Around the World’s Most Beguiling Map by Joseph Nigg. © University of Chicago Press, 2013.

 

Prints: Olaus Magnus (1539)

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